Archive for December, 2014

December 11, 2014

Bringing the data revolution to education, and education to the data revolution

Post2015.org - what comes after the MDGs?

Written by Pauline Rose, Professor of International Education, University of Cambridge.

Calls for a data revolution are putting the spotlight on the importance of more and better data as a means to hold policymakers to account for post-2015 goals. In many ways, education has been at the forefront of approaches to measuring progress over the past 15 years. The influence of the Education for All Global Monitoring Report (GMR) and the efforts of the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) in improving the availability of education data provide important lessons for tracking progress post-2015. This experience should play an important contribution to informing the practical next steps for the data revolution.

Building on this experience, a roundtable held at the Overseas Development Institute on 17 November brought together over 40 technical experts, who debated approaches to measuring progress towards post-2015 education targets, with a focus on learning and equity. The…

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December 11, 2014

Why statisticians should welcome the Data Revolution

Data belongs to all

Post2015.org - what comes after the MDGs?

Written by Bill Anderson, Data Standards and Systems Advisor at Development Initiatives.

“Here are two ideas of the moment:

-Monitoring the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires a huge investment in an international framework that delivers globally compatible statistics.

-Sustainable development requires a huge investment in data collection capacity so that decision makers at national and sub-national levels have access to usable information from sustainable sources.

They are not the same thing. Herein lies the problem with Morten Jerven’s critique of the UN Independent Expert Advisory Group report on the Data Revolution.

Statistics and data are not the same. Statistics are derived from data. The more (reliable) data that exists the fewer extrapolations statisticians need to make and the more they can focus on quality and consistency within and across datasets.”

Read the full post here.

 

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December 4, 2014

Youth well-being: measuring what matters

Post2015.org - what comes after the MDGs?

4-15 December

Wikiprogress invite you to join their online conversations on how the goal of youth well-being can be better incorporated into measurement and policy.

Context

The aim of this discussion is to map out the main issues for youth well-being and to identify organisations and initiatives working in this field. This discussion will provide the foundation for a more in-depth online debate that we will be hosting in early 2015.

Everyone is welcome to join the discussion, and we are especially interested to hear from students and young people from around the world.

There are more youth living in the world today than at any other time in human history. There are now an unprecedented 1.8 billion adolescents and young adults aged between 10 and 24, making up over a quarter of the world population (UN Population Fund). However, young people’s voices are not always heard in measurement and…

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December 4, 2014

A critical moment to engage young people

We cannot be guaranteed to have a good future is we don’t involve the real stakeholders and in this case, the Youth

Post2015.org - what comes after the MDGs?

Youth_Wellbeing_Banner

This post is by Katherine Ellis, Director of Youth at the Commonwealth Secretariat. In 2013, the Commonwealth launched the first-ever global Youth Development Index, which measures the status of young people in 170 countries around the world. This blog has been posted as part of the Wikiprogress discussion on “Youth well-being: measuring what matters!

As the world deliberates on the post-2015 agenda, there has never been a more critical moment to engage young people. The inclusion of youth perspectives, and the energy, diversity and talent that young people bring, is a clear-cut imperative. Young people have an incredible amount to offer to national development processes, and, with the right support and opportunities, can be empowered to realise their full potential.

Today, almost half of the world’s population (48.9%, according to Euromonitor International) is aged under 30, and the proportion is generally much higher in developing countries. It is…

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