Archive for ‘Emergency’

July 4, 2014

Ombudman’s Mathare Launched

2014-06-04 11.52.37The living condition in places like Mathare and the level of neglect by the government warrants quick measure by the residents to hold public servants accountable.
In some quarters it is said that 60% of Nairobi residents live under deplorable conditions.No existence of important service is a common feature.

Launching of the local Ombudsman Committee, ten members in Mathare has come at time when we have several government services being devolved at ward levels. The Mathare Constituency Ombudsman Committee will be based at Mathare Valley Polytechnic next to Mathare Chief’s Camp.
It is hoped that unlike before when resident did not know where to report, this time round things will be different.

Cases of police harassment, lack of responding on time to emergencies like fire outbreak are common. Kenyans are yet to fully trust that systems work like the judiciary and accessing proper justice for slum dwellers in still a pipe dream in Kenya.

With the office coming closer to the people, it is time for people to seize the opportunity and hold all public servant accountable. When forceful evictions occur this time round, we hope it will be investigated and proper action be taken against any public official abetting the vice.

Case Handling Levels see the website: (http://www.ombudsman.go.ke).

April 13, 2014

Street Children: Dr. Manu Chandaria

Dr. Manu Chandaria Reaching out to the less fortunate in society

Dr. Manu Chandaria Reaching out to the less fortunate in society


Can you imagine asking 200,000 questions to 40,000,000 people? This might seem impossible. Meet Dr. Manu Chandaria, Kenyan Industrialist who is currently the leading advocate for the plight and rights of street children in Kenya. I met him and his brother at International Day for Street Children on 12.04.2014 at St. Teresa’s Girls Secondary School. This day has been set aside for ‘giving voice to street children so their rights cannot be ignored.
Globally it is estimated that there are 100 million street children who live and work on the streets under very difficult circumstance however debate abound about the figures. But one thing is certainly is clear, the number of street children have been raising and more importantly street families especially in Kenya. Kenya is estimated to have between 200,000 – 300,000 street children. To witness the problem in Nairobi, one needs to walk around Globe Cinema Roundabout either in the morning or evening.
There are only two people in Kenya, late Fr. Arnold Grol and Dr. Manu Chandaria who have dedicated time and resources to help street children passionately and genuinely. Dr. Manu Chandaria speaks about street children with ease and one would easily conclude him to be an expert in this field.
The usual picture of street children in Kenya is that of dirty clothes, glue sniffing, unruly, rough and hunger. But behind all these, we have normal human beings who are positive about life. I attended the celebration to the mark the International Day for Street Children and had the opportunity to listen to Dr. Manu Chandaria ask, “What can 40 million Kenyans do to address the plight of 200,000, street children? For Dr. Manu Chandaria OBE & OBS, a famous industrialist he sees potential in street children and that is why during the event, he mingled so easily with the street children.
Dr. Manu Chandaria would like to see an environment where street children are treated with dignity and facilitated to be part of wider society since he believes that they have potential to make a positive contribution in making Kenya a better place.
I spoke to more than 50 street children from different ‘bases’ and they all expressed desire to live in a decent environment where they can access education, training, medical care and jobs. Some Non Governmental Organizations have managed to organize themselves to provide services such as vocational skills training, health, food, clothing and shelter but this is not enough. While the problem of street children is a worldwide concern, our government can do better to address problems faced by 300,000 who live in inhuman condition. If we can invest billions for roads, railways and drilling oil in Turkana then what about investing in our own children? The 47 County Governments in Kenya can be pushed to allocate special funds to address issues related to street children.
Street children problem is human problem which can only be solved by human beings. If Kenya had so many Dr. Manu Chandaria then we would have been able to provide decent life to our children on the street.

June 6, 2012

Elections and Unresolved IDPs Issue in Mathare

As in other places in Kenya, Mathare residents are eagerly awaiting the date for the next elections with alot of anxiety. This is because Mathare constituency has been created and it has six wards. People will be expected to elect an MP and also six county assembly representatives. Possible aspirants have started emerging with promises. One notable thing about aspirants is very few women have emerged to contest in Mathare as a whole. The current atmosphere does not favour women. There is need to support and encourage possible women aspirants.

My worry is that issues related to internally displaced persons (IDPs) has not been fully resolved. Urban IDPs from Mathare area feels that they have been a forgotten lot. Families that were displaced from Kijiji cha Chewa during the height of post election violence feel neglected by the administration. Frequent transfer of chiefs and their assistants has hampered efforts to resolve their issues.

As we approach elections, these families will elect new leadership which might not be sensitive to their needs. There is need to assist these families as new challenges might emerge in coming elections and these might be a forgotten lot. But what will be the result? During the 1992 land clashes in the Rift Valley and forceful evictions of families at Muoroto in Nairobi the end result was increase in the number of street children and beggars in major urban centres. This is a situation that noboday would want to see again. – Simon

 

May 18, 2012

Community First Aid Kits

Walking through any urban informal settlement an outsider will see ‘disaster waiting happen’ scenes. Looking at small children playing cooking games with fire, women washing clothes in dirty river, haphazard crossing of Juja Road, open electric wires, possibility of being mugged in dark place,  regular fire outbreaks and people living next to big rocks. The dangers posed broken sewer and open ones are even great incase of major disease outbreak. All these are scenes one will encounter while walking in Mathare.

There have been cases of fire outbreaks which led to loss of life and this was contributed by lack of access road in the inner parts of the community; There are no emergency numbers readily available in the community that people can call for assistance. When assistance is called it takes longer than usual since most people will expect community leaders to be the person to call.

Those who gets injured through various activities both good and back have to seek assistance in far places since the health centres near the community do not operate of 24 hrs basis. This mean that if a disaster strikes at night then it is most likely that number of causalities will be very high compared with day time. Availing first aid kits in strategic points within the community can help reduce number of casualities.  While there has been investments in improving infrastructure, very little has been done to deal with disaster. Having emergency telephone/mobile number people can all and erecting first aid centre can help reduce the number of causalities.  – Simon

February 7, 2012

Drug trafficking in Matharevalley Schools

Primary school students in slums are being used to traffic drugs. This was revealed by various teachers and other education stake holders based in Mathare. It is emerging that some parents and guardians have forced school children to engage in drug trafficking during schools holidays and other free days.

Speaking to map mathare, mathare north primary government School Head Teacher, Mr. James onyango noted that the most affected are the girls. He also noted that the most commonly abused drug in the slum is chang’aa. “The pupils are forced by their parents and guardians to sell the illicit liquor and other drugs to the slum dwellers,” he complains.

The head teacher further noted an incident involving one of the girls in the school who had been sexually abused and kidnapped by her mother’s drug clients. Though the community rescued the minor, the mother has been reluctant to press any charges against the abuser, afraid to lose business.”I wrote a letter to the police informing them of the incident but no action was taken. It is alleged that the mother owes a lot of money to the kidnapper and that’s the reason she is afraid of confronting him,” he alleges.

onyango added that such cases of sexual abuse are common in the slums especially when the children are involved in drug trafficking. As a result, many pupils have been forced out of school because they have slowly turned to drug abuse while others prefer to continue with their parents’ trade. While the girls are forced to give birth at an early age as a result of sexual abuse, most of the boys end up as hard core criminals. These children learn at an early age how to earn easy money through drug trafficking. As a result, they drop out of school and turn to crime to be able to sustain their economic needs. Joyce, a teacher, has decried the low moral standard which has led to child abuse by relatives and family friends. She noted that there is need to sensitize parents and guardians on the importance of education and respect for children rights.

However, the teachers were quick to add that the main reasons for the failure to protect the rights of children are lack of education, and poverty among the parents and guardians. They are therefore calling upon the government to put in place stricter laws to ensure that children from both poor and rich backgrounds are protected against such kind of abuses:-javin

January 26, 2012

Urban IDPs, Forgotten Lot

Mabatini, Huruma Corner and Kiamaiko were some of the hot spots of 2008 post election violence in Mathare which resulted to setting up of a camp for internally displaced persons at Mathare chief’s camp. The IDPs were from Mathare 3c, Mabatini and Mashimoni areas.

Today former IDPs held a demonstration to protest what they term as a case of them being forgotten or neglected by the government and NGOs. One of the leader of IDPs from Mathare lamented that while in other areas (Rift Valley) IDPs had been resettled or their -plight addressed unlike those from urban areas like Mathare had been forgotten.

Most IDPs I interviewed expressed concern that ‘the IDPs from Rift Vallye are being favoured while those from Mathare have been forgotten’.

After the confirmation of ICC case, IDPs from Mathare felt that nobody was addressing their plight or compensation package. A woman who was part of the demonstration said ‘the ICC case has become more to do with Ruto and Uhuru than victims of post of election violence like us. The government has rushed to form a team to look into Uhuru and Muthaura’s case but not about the IDPs’. This motivated IDPs today to match to Marthare District Offices to seek audience over the matter of compensation. The previous space which was occupied by IDPS had now been turned into urban farming demonstration centre for the community to address food insecurity in Mathare. – Simon

January 18, 2012

Violence and Weapons of Mass Destruction

Mathare 3C: Violence victim at Kenyatta National Hospital

Mathare 3C is well known for brewing of chan’gaa and on several occasion for eruption of violence. On 15th January 2012 rumours had it that 16 pangas had brought into the community in readiness for the announcement from Hague. In another section of the community, small traders located opposite Moi Air Base are living in fear of possible eviction from the site. Reason? Several soldiers have been attacked by criminals hiding in the nearby slums. Small traders are waiting for possible eviction anytime from now. Traders from different ethnic background have decided to deal with criminal and they have formed a group to keep vigil and ensure no more thieve will operate in their zone.

Elsewhere women are discussing increased insecurity in the area whereby their husbands have been attacked by criminals on their way from work

In the evening of 15th January 2012; local leaders, small traders, administration and senior police officers have organized a meeting to discuss the escalating insecurity and tension in the area and also looking at the rumours about the pangas. Why did someone bring 16 pangs?

After meeting that night, violence erupted.  Five people who actively contributed and participated in the security meeting are attacked. They are left bleeding and nursing serious wounds after being attacked. Two people are admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). A few community members come forward to donate blood.

The following morning tension is high and the real reason behind the violence has been overlooked and distorted. The area MP, Hon Margaret Wanjiru appears on the scene…as usual being a politician she politicize the whole issue. The criminals who were being pursued by traders turn it into tribal war. From the above scenario it is becoming evident that gangs are emerging and insecurity is slowly creeping in. At the end of it all weapons of mass destruction to watch out as we approach elections are; rumours, politicization of issues, stones, pangas/machete, tribalism, fire and forceful eviction. –  Simon

January 16, 2012

MATHARE 2012 PERSPECTIVE

2012 will not be an ordinary year for Mathare residents. There is boundary review and the forth coming general elections. This will change overall power relation between the people and local administration. We shall also witness emergence of new leaders; will they follow and be guided by the constitution? let us wait and see. A place like Huruma will now be divided into two if the proposal goes through.

There will be need for the government to invest more in health, road, sewer, security, education and stimulating local economy. Chang’aa has been legalized, how will the local leadership transform this sector from informal to formal industry? How will the local community monitor and hold its leaders accountable. These are only but a few issues that must be addressed in Mathare.

Civic education forums needs to be established if we are to avoid post election violence as witnessed in 2007/2008.

The good news that has come out of the boundary review is the mention of approximate population of Mathare which according to Independent Electrol and Boundary Commission (IEBC) is as follows

Proposed Mathare Constituency
Mlango Kubwa- ward 20463
Mabatini – ward 48723
Huruma A – ward 36248
Huruma B – ward 36247
Kiamaiko – ward 33824
  175,505

Previously people estimated the population. Now it is upon Mathare residents to appear before the commission and share their view regarding the boundary. It is these views that will help shape a better Mathare.-Simon

November 28, 2011

Road Accidents Along Juja Road Mathare No 10

November 28, 2011

Killer building in mathare

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